BLM activists threaten ‘riots’ and ‘bloodshed’ if Eric Adams reinstates NYPD’s anti-crime units 💥👩💥

A Black Lives Matter leader has threatened ‘riots’ and ‘bloodshed’ in the streets if Mayor-elect Eric Adams reinstates the NYPD’s anti-crime units.

The comments came from New York BLM co-founder Hawk Newsome after debating Adams during a contentious closed-door sit-down event with the incoming Democrat leader.

While Adams was able to make headway with the activists on his plans to fight poverty in the black community when he takes office, the former NYPD captain vowed to bring back the controversial anti-crime units composed of about 600 plainclothes officers that target violent crimes – something BLM was angry about.

Adams and Newsome also clashed about accountability, with the mayor-elect hitting back at the activist and saying he, too, needs to be held accountable – not just sit back and make demands.

The mayor-elect called out the group during their closed-door meeting: ‘You’re on the ground: Stop the violence in my community. I’m holding you accountable.

‘Don’t hold me accountable,’ Adams went on. ‘Being the mayor, being the borough president, being the state senator – I put my body on the line for my community, so I’m not here for folks to come and say, “Eric, we’re gonna hold you accountable.”‘

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Newsome, a controversial New York figure who has labeled members of the U.S. government ‘terrorists’ because the ‘government goes and pillages different countries,’ on Wednesday slammed the mayor-elect’s hard-nosed approach to bring back the units, which were disbanded in 2020 at the height of the violent BLM protests.

When the BLM leader asked during their sit-down if the stop-and-frisk is coming back, the mayor-elect responded: ‘Stop-and-frisk never went away, brother.’

‘It’s about bringing back a sense of protection in our city and not the disorder we feel at this time,’ Adams had said earlier this month prior to being elected, regarding his plan to clean up the city streets – which have seen an influx of violent crime since the start of the pandemic.

New York BLM co-founder Hawk Newsome, pictured during an NYC press conference in September 2021, has threatened ‘riots’ and ‘bloodshed’ in the streets if Mayor-elect Eric Adams reinstates the NYPD’s anti-crime units

Newsome told attendees outside Brooklyn Borough Hall on Wednesday that if Adams brings back the axed units, history will be doomed to repeat itself.

‘If they think they are going back to the old ways of policing, then we’re going to take to the streets again,’ Newsome said. ‘There will be riots. There will be fire, and there will be bloodshed.’

Speaking after the sit-down to the New York Post, Newsome said: ‘To ignore that history and say you’re bringing it back means that he’s tone deaf.’

He also told the New York Daily News: ‘There is no way that he is going to let some Gestapo come in here and harm our people. We pray for peace but … prepare for the worst.’

Adams, a moderate candidate, defeated progressive rivals in June’s Democratic primary on a law-and-order ticket, pledging to crack down on violent crime that has soared in New York City since the coronavirus pandemic.

However, on the campaign trail last year, he was criticized by progressive candidates for vowing to reinstate the anti-crime unit.

Chivona Newsome, a BLM co-founder and sister of Hawk Newsome, made similar threats should the unit be brought back.

‘We will shut the city down. We will shut down City Hall, and we will give him hell and make it a nightmare,’ she said.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams (pictured delivering his victory speech on November 2), a moderate candidate, defeated progressive rivals in June's Democratic primary on a law-and-order ticket, pledging to crack down on violent crime that soared in New York City during the pandemic

Mayor-elect Eric Adams (pictured delivering his victory speech on November 2), a moderate candidate, defeated progressive rivals in June’s Democratic primary on a law-and-order ticket, pledging to crack down on violent crime that soared in New York City during the pandemic

At the closed-door event on Wednesday, Adams told leaders that as the city’s second black mayor, he was the best-equipped to usher in meaningful socioeconomic and educational change to New York’s communities.

‘There’s one thing that we do agree on, that we need to change conditions that people are living in, historical conditions. And the conditions have not changed,’ Adams said during the discussion, which was live-streamed on Instagram.

And as the city’s second black mayor – after Democrat David Dinkins, who was elected in the early 90s as New York dealt with instances of racial unrest, crime and fiscal turmoil eerily similar to what the city is currently facing amid fallout from the pandemic – he was the person best-suited to bring positive change to the community, Adams said.

‘What I know for sure, is there is no one in this city that’s going to deal with this issue as the mayor of this city better than I’m going to,’ he said.

But Adams and the BLM representatives got into a shouting match as they argued over police policies, with the mayor-elect becoming incensed when Hawk Newsome told him the organization would hold him accountable for future NYPD misconduct.

Adams responded: ‘You’re on the ground: Stop the violence in my community. I’m holding you accountable.

‘Don’t hold me accountable,’ Adams went on. ‘Being the mayor, being the borough president, being the state senator — I put my body on the line for my community, so I’m not here for folks to come and say, “Eric, we’re gonna hold you accountable.”

‘No, it’s us. We need to do this together.’

Adam’s comments prompted Chivona Newsome to retort: ‘You’re the mayor of New York! There’s only so much we can do.’

Adams said he disagreed, but Chivona Newsome pressed on, telling him that she believes public safety would improve in the city if the mayor creates better jobs and education. ‘That’s a government issue,’ she said.

‘You need to be corrected,’ Adams interjected. ‘You need to be corrected based on what you’re saying. Don’t tell me, “I need to do this” … say, “We need to do this.”‘

Hawke Newsome: BLM co-founder who stands 6-foot-6 and walks around NYC in a bullet proof vest

Hawk Newsome, 44, a black activist and co-founder of Black Lives Matter of Greater New York, heads one of the most prominent BLM organizations not affiliated with the original network, the Black Lives Matter Global Group. He founded the group with his sister, Chivona Newsome.

In a statement released on June 25, 2020, the Black Lives Matter Global Group distanced themselves from Newsome, who stands at an imposing 6-foot-6 and regularly walks around the city wearing a bulletproof vest.

‘Hawk Newsome has no relation to the Black Lives Matter Global Network (“BLM”) founded by Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza, and Opal Tometi — and is not the “president” of BLM or any of its chapters,’ BLM Global Network Managing Director Kailee Scales said in the bulletin.

Newsome currently lives in the South Bronx with Chivona, their mother, Doris, and his 18-year-old son, William. He also has a daughter, Assata, 3, who lives with her mother.

In June 2020, Newsome waged war on the New York Police Department, saying the Black Lives Matter of Greater New York group is ‘mobilizing’ its base and aims to develop a highly-trained ‘military’ arm to challenge police brutality head on.

He also detailed plans to release a blueprint for change that involves Black Panther-style armed ‘patrols’ monitoring the behavior of officers on the streets.

‘We want liberation,’ Newsome told DailyMail.com exclusively at the time. ‘We want the power to determine our own destiny. We want freedom from an oppressive government, and we want the immediate end of government sanctioned murder by the police. And we are prepared to stop these government sanctioned murders by any means necessary.’

‘We are preparing and training our people to defend our communities.’

The brazen statement infuriated many Americans amid increasingly violent BLM protests in recent years that have sparked violence and destruction across the U.S.

Newsome went on to add that he believes his group can lead the ‘war on police.’

When asked about the comments he made to DailyMail.com by Fox News Channel’s Martha MacCallum later that month, the BLM New York leader threatened to dismantle the U.S. government and ‘burn down this system’ if officials didn’t pander to the requests made by his group.

‘If this country doesn’t give us what we want, then we will burn down this system and replace it,’ he said at the time, before cryptically adding: ‘I could be speaking figuratively. I could be speaking literally. It’s a matter of interpretation.’

Newsome added that his chapter was raising a ‘war chest’ and plans to build a headquarters in an unused New York church, as hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets of cities across the country, calling for police reforms after the killing of George Floyd by a white police officer in Minneapolis on May 25 of that year.

Despite the fact that many of these protests devolved into violence, with several instances of looting and arson, the activist said the protests were getting positive results, and that he did not condemn them.

‘Let’s observe the history of the 1960s, when Black people were rioting,’ he told the right-leaning network.

‘We had the highest growth in wealth, in property ownership.

‘Think about the last few weeks since we started protesting.

‘There have been eight cops fired across the country.

‘I don’t condone nor do I condemn rioting.

‘But I’m just telling you what I observed.’

Then-President Donald Trump labelled Newsome’s comments as ‘treason, sedition, insurrection.’

In another interview that summer with MacCallum, Newsome equated members of the U.S. government to ‘terrorists,’ while defending the protestors and leaders, after former NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani implored Trump to declare Black Lives Matter a ‘domestic terrorist organization.’

‘He’s talking about black people and white people who are out there fighting for the rights of every human being – for equity, for human rights – and he’s calling us terrorists?’ Newsome said in August in response to Giuliani’s comments.

‘OK, so when America goes and steals diamonds and oils, who’s calling us terrorists? When the American government goes and pillages different countries, who’s calling us terrorists?’ Newsome asked MacCallum, as the interview devolved into a shouting match between the two.

Newsome further declared that any criticism of the looters was a byproduct of white supremacy.

Newsome’s group has since seen a flood of donations from celebrities and high worth individuals supporting his contentious call to arms.

After the meeting, the activists were furious, with Hawk Newsome saying he heard nothing from Adams to suggest he will try to fundamentally reform the NYPD.

It was the first time Hawk Newsome has met the incoming mayor, and told the New York Post that he had refused offers to meet from Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration, calling the outgoing mayor a ‘buffoon.’

The controversial BLM leader even went as far to take credit for Adams’ election victory, claiming the movement allowed him to ‘achieve power.’

‘At least with Eric Adams, we have a clean slate,’ Hawk Newsome said, adding that he still plans to work with the mayor-elect on ‘anti-violence programs and food programs.’

But Hawk said he was concerned that Adams ‘didn’t offer a comment on police reform… he wouldn’t offer us anything concrete.’

‘We will be at his front door, we will be at Gracie Mansion, we will be in the streets, if he allows these police to abuse us,’ Newsome told the Post. ‘I am not threatening anyone. I am just saying that it’s a natural response to aggressive oppression, people will react.’

Adams said he thought there was ‘no reason we cannot have both safe streets and racial justice in our city,’ saying, ‘If black lives truly matter, then we must address violence in our communities while we address bias in policing.

‘Yelling and not listening gets us nowhere.’

Adams’ election comes as New York City has been crippled by increasing crime.

Shootings soared across the city last summer after Mayor Bill de Blasio did away with the plainclothes unit in June 2020, after an outpour of anti-police sentiment following George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis and the ‘defund the police’ movement.

Violent crime has since continued to escalate in New York City, with total crime up 2.6% in September 2021 compared to September 2020.

Pictured: Black Lives Matter protesters scuffle with New York City police officers outside the Met Gala on Fifth Avenue on September 13, 2021

Pictured: Black Lives Matter protesters scuffle with New York City police officers outside the Met Gala on Fifth Avenue on September 13, 2021

Violent crime has since continued to escalate in New York City

Violent crime has since continued to escalate in New York City

According to NYPD crime data, the city has had 1,526 shooting victims this year through October 17, nearly double the amount of gun violence victims through the same time as 2019, which had 760. There were 1,507 shooting victims through October 17, 2020.

The data recorded 89 shooting victims 17 years old and younger from January 1 to September 26 of this year. In 2019, there were 45 shooting victims in that age group during the same time period.

Of those injured in shootings, 16 young people were killed by gun violence between January 1 and September 26, 2021 – an increase of more than 136 percent compared with the same time period in 2019, when three children or teens were killed.

According to the NYPD’s latest monthly numbers, overall crime was up 1.73 percent last month compared with November 2020. Felony assault was up by 8.3 percent and robbery rose by 2.1 percent.

As recently as Wednesday morning, a 62-year-old man was brutally attacked by a group of teenagers near Times Square at around 5:30 am – just days after international travel restrictions were lifted across the U.S., with tourists set to once again flock to the city ahead of the holiday season.

Video of the incident released by the NYPD shows the man being struck on the head from behind by one attacker, before being slashed in the face and stabbed in the neck by six additional assailants as he lay helplessly on the ground.

Violent crime has continued to escalate in New York City, with total crime up 2.6% in September 2021 compared to September 2020

Violent crime has continued to escalate in New York City, with total crime up 2.6% in September 2021 compared to September 2020

A map showing the New York City boroughs where crime has increased (in red) and decreased (in green) in September 2021 compared to the same month last year

A map showing the New York City boroughs where crime has increased (in red) and decreased (in green) in September 2021 compared to the same month last year

Adams opposes defunding the police and has vowed to spend the city’s almost $100 billion budget to bolster the force, which has come under fire amid the city’s recent string of violent crimes and protests.

‘This campaign was for those who have been betrayed by their government,’ he said. There is a covenant between government and the people of our city: you pay your taxes, we deliver your tax dollars through goods and services. We have failed to provide those goods and services – January 1, that stops. That stops!’ Adam said after being elected – beating out his Republican challenger Curtis Sliwa.

‘We’re going to go after the violent crimes we’re witnessing, particularly the over-proliferation of handguns. I’m going to put in place an anti-gun unit, plainclothes, and we’re going to do precision policing and go after those gangs and gun users,’ Adams said.

The mayor-elect – who grew up in abject poverty in Brownsville, Brooklyn – may have his work cut out for him, however, as the heads of the five major unions representing members of the NYPD warned that as many as 10,000 unvaccinated police officers were ‘set to be pulled from [the] streets’ earlier this month, after the city’s November 1 vaccine mandate deadline for New York City employees came and went.

So far, 34 officers have been pulled from active duty and put on unpaid leave.

De Blasio has recently – and carelessly, critics say – touted a ‘small’ decrease in the murder rate while ignoring an 11 percent jump in overall crime, claiming he has been successful in reducing crime.

Hizzoner focused in the drop in murders in to 37, compared to 41 in October 2020, saying the minor reduction of 9.8 percent ‘says a lot.’

However, both counts are higher than the number of citywide murders in October 2019 (29) and October 2018 (18).

The spike in overall lawlessness comes as the city grapples with an increase in visible, violent crime, including horrific subway and street attacks that have left New Yorkers terrified.

Last month, a man wearing a grinning mask inspired by the film The Purge attacked a stranger on the street with an ax. The 51-year-old victim was taken to a nearby hospital with a deep cut in his arm.

And on October 30, a man threw a Molotov cocktail into a Brooklyn bodega after an argument with employees. The workers escaped as the arsonist was about to throw a second one, but he was stopped by a witness.

De Blasio also said shootings are down in Queens and Staten Island compared to last year, and emphasized the decline in shootings in Brooklyn, which are down 20 percent from last year. There have been 445 shootings in Brooklyn so far this year, down from 557 at this point in the year in 2020 – but up significantly from 248 in 2019, before the COVID pandemic.

Shootings continue to climb in other parts of the city. ‘The Bronx is still a challenge – lots of resources being poured in to address Manhattan North as well,’ the mayor admitted.

De Blasio said shootings were down in other boroughs thanks to community and precision policing, which depend on deep ties with the community, according to the Manhattan Institute.

Adams has routinely vocalized his disapproval of de Blasio and took steps to distance himself from the city’s leader during his campaign.

He previously accused the progressive Democrat of not being ‘committed and dedicated to the city.’ Adams also said New York needs to move away from de Blasio’s policies which made it ‘a city of disorder’ and an ‘enemy of business.’

Adams vowed to enforce laws against less serious crimes during the Wednesday meeting with BLM leaders. ‘We’re going to look at the quality of life issues – there’s far too many open use of drugs on our streets such as heroin,’ he said.

‘We’re seeing some of the petty crimes of stealing in our stores that are going unaccounted for.’

The new mayor is slated to assume leadership of America’s largest city on January 1.

How NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio is under fire for spiraling crime rates and handling of pandemic

Democrat Bill de Blasio’s tenure as the 109th New York City Mayor has been marred by controversy since he was elected in 2014.

Criticism during his time in office includes the spiralling crime on the city’s streets, his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, and his fractious relationship with NYPD.

He has also come under fire for his approach to the Eric Garner case and his plans to increase affordable housing at the expense of the city’s character.

Crime has also become a frequent stain on de Blasio’s tenure in office, with statistics showing that both shootings and felony assaults had both increased in number compared to last year – with de Blasio blaming the court system.

Shootings in April 2021 in New York surged by 166 per cent compared to the same month last year, and felony assaults had risen by 35.6 per cent – while crime as a whole jumped by 30.4 per cent.

High crime rates, paired with the nation’s highest tax rates have also seen many people ditching New York City for good – with the coronavirus pandemic providing the push they needed.

Bill de Blasio (pictured) has served as the 109th mayor of New York City since he was elected in back in 2014, though his time in office has been marred with controversy

Bill de Blasio (pictured) has served as the 109th mayor of New York City since he was elected in back in 2014, though his time in office has been marred with controversy

De Blasio has also endured some controversial episodes during his time in office, such as in 2014. Eric Garner died after former New York City police officer Daniel Pantaleo put him into a choke hold on Staten Island – but the officer retained his job.

He has also endured a strained relationship with the NYPD, with many officers turning their backs on him during the funeral for Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos.

The two officers had been shot just weeks after de Blasio gave an interview in which he claimed to have told his son Dante, who is biracial, about the ‘dangers’ posed by the police to young black men.

Similarly, de Blasio faced backlash after he did not attend the vigil held for New York City police officer Miosotis Familia in July 2017. While speaking at Familia’s service, many police officers again chose to turn their backs on de Blasio.

Elsewhere, de Blasio has also been criticised for how he has dealt with the Covid-19 pandemic. During the second week of March 2020, he did not act to close down public schools as the virus rapidly spread.

When he eventually did give the order for schools to be shut, he was called out for having been too slow.

De Blasio has also faced criticism over a recent vaccination mandate he imposed on school staff.

BLM activists threaten ‘riots’ and ‘bloodshed’ if Eric Adams reinstates NYPD’s anti-crime units

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