Covid US: Biden administration has ‘run out of ideas’ to get more people vaccinated πŸ’₯πŸ‘©πŸ’₯

President Joe Biden‘s administration is out of ideas on how to raise the stagnate COVID vaccination rate and is moving ahead with how to manage the pandemic with only 68% of adults vaccinated, according to a report on Monday.

Resistance to getting a shot in the arm, led by some Republicans, has caused the vaccination rate to flatline despite an all-out effort by the White House to raise it. Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and Second Gentleman Doug Emhoff have been on a nation-wide tour to urge vaccinations.

But administration officials are now looking at the next steps as 91 million people remain unvaccinated and 42 states are seeing an increase in COVID infections in the last week as the Delta variant causes cases to spike.

Officials are running out of ideas for jumpstarting the pace of coronavirus vaccinations, Politico reported.

‘We are under no illusions that each person in this stage will take longer to reach,’ a senior administration official said. ‘The first 180 million were much easier than the next 5 million.’

White House press secretary Jen Psaki defended the administration’s outreach program on vaccinations in her press briefing on Monday.

‘We want to make sure we are lifting up some of the innovative innovative ways that Americans across the country are meeting their communities where they are with the vaccine,’ she said.

‘We all have a duty to continue making the cases of vaccine to our friends and family. Companies, media and individuals all can play a special role as trusted messengers to an unvaccinated person by sharing the fact that the vaccines are safe, effective, accessible and free across the country we’re seeing Americans, step up,’ she added.

Fauci said the spread of the Delta variant, which makes up more than half of all cases (above), is worrisome because it is more infectious and therefore will continue to spread in communities with low vaccination rates

Fauci said the spread of the Delta variant, which makes up more than half of all cases (above), is worrisome because it is more infectious and therefore will continue to spread in communities with low vaccination rates

The news outlet talked with more than a half-dozen federal and state officials working on the COVID response, who acknowledged that none of the administration’s outreach efforts are likely to raise the vaccination rates – and that there are few remaining options to try.

In the US, 59% of adults are fully vaccinated while 68% have at least one shot, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data. For the total population, 184 million have at least one shot while 159 million are fully vaccinated.

Less than half of all Americans – 48% – are fully vaccinated.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki defended the administration’s efforts in one of her press briefings last week when she was asked about the declining vaccination rate.

‘Our focus now is on doubling down on our efforts as we continue to vaccinate millions of people across the summer months,’ she said on Tuesday.

‘It is ultimately up to individuals to decide if they are going to get vaccinated,’ she added. ‘But, no, these programs will continue, and we’re going to continue to press forward on approaches that we have seen work in the past.’

President Joe Biden's administration is out of ideas on how to raise the stagnate COVID vaccination rate

President Joe Biden’s administration is out of ideas on how to raise the stagnate COVID vaccination rate

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said Monday that a large segment of the population is now left vulnerable to infection from the Delta variant.

‘Given the number of people in the country who are not vaccinated, that really is the concern because the vaccines we have available…do very well against the Delta variant, particularly protecting against severe disease leading to hospitalization,’ he told CBS’ This Morning.

‘We’re concerned about those regions of the country, those states, those areas, those cities in which the level of vaccination is really quite low, hovering around 30 percent or so,’ he said.

According to CDC data updated last week, the Delta variant, also known as B.1.617.2, makes up 51.7 percent of all new infections.

The Delta variant has been detected in all 50 states and accounts for more than 80 percent of new infections in Midwestern states such as Iowa, Kansas and Missouri, where vaccination rates are lagging.

Republicans have been pounding the administration’s attempt to get more shots in arms, particularly it’s ‘door-to-door’ program.

In the past three months, the vaccination rate among counties that voted for Donald Trump has dropped in greater numbers compared to counties that voted for Biden.

Three months ago, as of April 22, the average vaccination rate in counties that voted for Trump was 20.6% compared to 22.8% in Biden counties, according to a data analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. That was a 2.2% gap.

By May 11, the gap had increased to 6.5%. By July 6, the vaccination rate in Trump counties was 35% compared to 46.7% in Biden counties for a 11.7% gap.

COVID-19 cases have soared by 30% in one week in the U.S. from 4,739 infections recorded last Sunday to 6,164 new cases this Sunday

COVID-19 cases have soared by 30% in one week in the U.S. from 4,739 infections recorded last Sunday to 6,164 new cases this Sunday

Republicans, like Rep. Lauren Boebert, have slammed administration efforts to get more shots in arms, painting its door-to-door program as government intrusion

Republicans, like Rep. Lauren Boebert, have slammed administration efforts to get more shots in arms, painting its door-to-door program as government intrusion

Dr. Anthony Fauci said that a large segment of the population is now left vulnerable to infection because of the Delta variant

Dr. Anthony Fauci said that a large segment of the population is now left vulnerable to infection because of the Delta variant

Conservatives viewed Biden’s ‘door-to-door’ quote as government intrusion.

‘How about don’t knock on my door. You’re not my parents. You’re the government. Make the vaccine available, and let people be free to choose. Why is that concept so hard for the left?’ tweeted Rep. Dan Crenshaw, a Texas Republican.

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, a Georgia Republican, again tied the Biden’s administration’s coronavirus response to Nazi Germany.

‘Biden pushing a vaccine that is NOT FDA approved shows covid is a political tool used to control people,’ she tweeted Tuesday afternoon. ‘People have a choice, they don’t need your medical brown shirts showing up at their door ordering vaccinations.’

The term ‘brown shirt’ comes from the official uniform of the SA or Sturmabteilung, the Nazi party’s paramilitary unit.

And Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado called the program ‘needle Nazis.’

‘Biden has deployed his Needle Nazis to Mesa County,’ she wrote on Twitter. ‘The people of my district are more than smart enough to make their own decisions about the experimental vaccine and don’t need coercion by federal agents. Did I wake up in Communist China?’

The administration has defended its program.

‘This is no time for politics. This is a public health issue. And viruses and public health don’t know the difference between a Democrat, a Republican or an independent,’ Fauci said Sunday on ABC’s This Week.

‘One of the ways to do that is to get trusted messengers without any political ideology differences out there — that could be clergy, that could be trusted messengers in the community, that could be your family physician — to get people to put aside this political issue and say, what am I going to be able to do for my own safety and for that of my family?,’ he said.

‘We have got to get away from the divisiveness that has really been a problem right from the very beginning with this outbreak,’ he noted.

Covid US: Biden administration has ‘run out of ideas’ to get more people vaccinated

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