Vaccine sceptic, 46, dies of Covid after warning ‘anyone with similar thoughts’ to get jab πŸ’₯πŸ‘©πŸ’₯

Removal firm boss Brian Lynch, 46, warned others to get the vaccine from his intensive care bed just before dying from Covid-19

A vaccine sceptic who warned others from his intensive care bed not to delay getting the jab like him has died from coronavirus.

Removal firm boss Brian Lynch, 46, said he was not an anti-vaxxer, but wanted more long-term scientific data before getting the jab.

He was admitted to Royal Blackburn Hospital on July 7 and spent weeks in intensive care, during which he vowed to friends he would get the vaccine if he recovered.

In a Facebook post from his ICU bed Mr Lynch said he felt ‘the most frightened he had ever been’ and admitted he ‘thought it was the vulnerable and the elderly who got hospitalised’.

But Mr Lynch, of Blackburn, Lancashire, was later placed in a medically-induced coma and died with his family and wife Gina by his side on July 31.

Mr Lynch’s death is the latest in a series of vaccine sceptics and anti-vaxxers who have died after refusing to receive the jab this year.

His death also comes as:

  • Coronavirus cases increased in the UK for the third time in a row with Department of Health bosses declaring a further 27,429 infections;
  • The number of people dying with Covid decreased to 39 today – a decrease of 40 per cent;
  • Figures showed 130,320 people who have tested positive have now lost their life to the virus since the start of the pandemic;
  • Scientists claimed Britain will not need another lockdown to stop a third Covid wave;
  • SAGE member Professor Neil Ferguson said he now believes the pandemic is something the UK will be able to manage with vaccines rather than ‘crisis measures’.

Close family friend Nicky Ashton had organised a pub fundraiser prior to the tragedy to support Mr Lynch ahead of his return home, and the event went ahead as planned on August 1.

Devastated Nicky said: ‘Brian would have wanted the day to go ahead.

‘We filled the pub inside and out – the day turned into a celebration full of love, tears and lots of talk and fond memories of Brian.

‘Most of Blackburn followed his story over the three weeks that Brian was in a coma and almost everyone you spoke to knew of his fight.

‘He really was one of the best people who would help anyone out and he will be missed so much .’

In a Facebook post on July 7, Mr Lynch explained how he ‘wasn’t feeling well’ so decided to take a PCR test, ‘despite what I think about testing and Covid vaccines.’

His wife, Gina Lynch, also contracted Covid-19 at the same time and was able to recover from her mild illness at home.

He wrote: ‘I sent off for a PCR test more in the interests of my family, friends and business customers. It came back positive.

‘I’ll be honest, I thought it was the vulnerable and the elderly who got hospitalised.

Brian Lynch, who wanted to wait for more data before getting the vaccine, pictured before he fell ill with Covid-19

Brian Lynch, who wanted to wait for more data before getting the vaccine, pictured before he fell ill with Covid-19

Mr Lynch was admitted to The Royal Blackburn Hospital, Lancashire and died after weeks of being treated on the intensive care unit

Mr Lynch was admitted to The Royal Blackburn Hospital, Lancashire and died after weeks of being treated on the intensive care unit

Mr Lynch said he felt 'the most frightened he had ever been' and admitted he 'thought it was the vulnerable and the elderly who got hospitalised'

Mr Lynch said he felt ‘the most frightened he had ever been’ and admitted he ‘thought it was the vulnerable and the elderly who got hospitalised’

‘Well, as I found out the hard way, my oxygen levels went down to 52 per cent and I could not get my breath.

‘It’s the most frightened I’ve ever been and I felt like I was being suffocated in my own body.

‘I’m now on ICU in Blackburn and been on a ventilator since I arrived trying to strengthen my lungs up and get my oxygen levels back up.

‘To anyone that may have similar sort of thoughts to this (as) I had, I just have to say this – I hope it doesn’t get you.’

Mr Lynch went on to say that he had been put on a ventilator in the intensive care unit, and took a selfie from his hospital bed.

Mr Lynch urged others from his hospital bed to get the vaccination via his social media posts

Mr Lynch urged others from his hospital bed to get the vaccination via his social media posts

He said he was determined to strengthen his lungs before saying ‘hopefully I’ll be out soon’.

A few days later on July 12 he wrote: ‘Well been awake since 4.45am, woke up coughing fit again, just managed to calm down after nearly an hour.

‘This Covid cough really is brutal can’t wait for it to dissipate. Can’t catch ya breath with it, just takes all your energy.’

Mr Lynch’s funeral will now be held at Pleasington Crematorium on August 13 at 1.30pm, but Covid-19 restrictions mean seats are limited.

However, the service can be listened to from outside the crematorium and it will be live streamed at the Havelock marquee.

The procession will pass the Havelock Inn pub, where everyone will be given the opportunity to pay their respects.

People will also be encouraged to wear the colour green and let off green smoke flares, a colour synonymous with Mr Lynch.

Mr Lynch’s death come just weeks after volunteer carer Glenn Barrett, 51, who is believed to have caught Covid-19 while watching England play Croatia in the Euro 2020 told nurses he wished he had been vaccinated before his death.

Mr Barrett died in the Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital in Grimsby on July 13, 2021 after battling the virus for three weeks.

His relatives said that he had not taken the opportunity to be vaccinated but his last words to nurses and doctors before he was placed in an induced coma were ‘I wish I had.’

The carer’s cousin, Ken Meech, who regarded Mr Barrett as a ‘big brother’, later urged members of the public to get vaccinated.

He said Mr Barrett had his ‘worries and reasons’ for not having the jab as he had no spleen and immune system issues.

Last month, self-confessed vaccine sceptic Matthew Keenan who said ‘if he could turn back time he would’ after he was admitted to hospital with Covid died with the virus at the age of 34.

Mr Keenan, who was placed in an induced coma in a bid to save his life, told friends that he ‘wished he had his jab’ after he was hospitalised at Bradford Royal Infirmary.

Dr Leanne Cheyne, a respiratory consultant at the West Yorkshire hospital, shared a photo of him in an oxygen mask and hooked up to a ventilator as he fought for his life.

Urging others to ‘grab a jab’, she wrote: ‘Matthew has agreed for me to share his story. 34, footie coach & dad. Self-confessed vaccine skeptic until he caught Covid. If he could turn back time he would. Our sickest patients are unvaccinated and under 40. Matthew is fighting for his life.. save yours.’

Mr Keenan, who was described as the ‘life of the party’, shared an image of his positive Covid lateral flow test on July 2. He said that the symptoms made him feel like he had been ‘hit by a truck’ after suffering from a fever and feeling ‘freezing and red hot’.

But it was later confirmed that Mr Keenan, who was described as the ‘kindest man’ by his friend Billy Brown, had died with the virus.

This month David Parker, 56, an anti-vaxxer nightclub boss also died of Covid-19 after mocking people for getting the ‘experimental’ vaccine and warning of a ‘big pharma’ conspiracy in hundreds of Facebook messages.

Mr Parker passed away at Darlington Memorial Hospital in County Durham on Monday despite having no underlying health conditions.

He had contracted the virus just weeks after condemning the vaccine and pharmaceutical companies in social media posts.

The family of Mr Parker, who spent a decade working as the manager of Club Louis in North Yorkshire, are said to now be urging everyone to get the jab.

Glenn Barrett (pictured), from Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, 51, who died in the Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital in Grimsby on July 13, 2021 after contracting Covid-19, told nurses he wished he had been vaccinated before his death

Glenn Barrett (pictured), from Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, 51, who died in the Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital in Grimsby on July 13, 2021 after contracting Covid-19, told nurses he wished he had been vaccinated before his death

Matthew Keenan told friends that he 'wished he had his jab' after he was hospitalised at Bradford Royal Infirmary and placed in an induced coma in a bid to save his life

Matthew Keenan told friends that he ‘wished he had his jab’ after he was hospitalised at Bradford Royal Infirmary and placed in an induced coma in a bid to save his life

David Parker (pictured above), 56, contracted the virus and died at Darlington Memorial Hospital in County Durham on Monday, despite having no underlying health conditions

David Parker (pictured above), 56, contracted the virus and died at Darlington Memorial Hospital in County Durham on Monday, despite having no underlying health conditions

John Eyers, 42, had been climbing the Welsh mountains and wild camping one month before his death from Covid last week

John Eyers, 42, had been climbing the Welsh mountains and wild camping one month before his death from Covid last week

In August, John Eyers, 42, a construction expert from Southport, Merseyside, also died of Covid-19 after refusing the vaccine.

Mr Eyers had been climbing the Welsh mountains and wild camping one month before his death last week, which came exactly four weeks after he tested positive.

His twin sister Jenny McCann from London said he was the ‘fittest, healthiest person I know’ and had thought he would only have a ‘mild illness’ if he contracted coronavirus, adding that he had a ‘belief in his own immortality’.

Mrs McCann said that Mr Eyers had ‘no underlying health conditions’ but did also state that he had asthma.

Before going onto a ventilator in hospital, Mr Eyers told his consultant that he wished he had been vaccinated .

He died in intensive care after suffering from an infection and organ failure, leaving behind a daughter aged 19.

It comes as the latest government figures today revealed coronavirus cases have increased for the third day in a row, with Department of Health bosses declaring a further 27,429 infections, a increase of 12 per cent on last Sunday’s figure of 27,429.

The number of people dying with the virus has decreased to 39 – a decrease of 40 per cent from 65 last Sunday.

Hospital admissions fell to 742 as of Tuesday, a 18.6 per cent decrease from the 912 people hospitalised in the previous week.

SAGE estimates the R rate β€” which shows how quickly the virus is spreading β€” is between 0.8 and 1.1. It means that, on average, every 10 people infected will infect between 8 and 11 other people

SAGE estimates the R rate β€” which shows how quickly the virus is spreading β€” is between 0.8 and 1.1. It means that, on average, every 10 people infected will infect between 8 and 11 other people

The rate is lowest in the North East and Yorkshire, as well as the North West, with both areas having a rate of around 0.7 to 1

The rate is lowest in the North East and Yorkshire, as well as the North West, with both areas having a rate of around 0.7 to 1

Britain’s total infections have now risen up to 6,069,362, while 130,320 people who have tested positive have lost their life to the virus since the start of the pandemic.

No10’s top scientists also claimed the R rate β€” which shows how quickly the coronavirus is spreading β€” has dipped below one for the first time in 12 weeks. The UK Health Security Agency said the reproduction rate is between 0.8 and 1.1. For comparison, last week’s figure stood at between 1.1 and 1.4.

It comes after scientists claimed Britain will not need another lockdown to stop another Covid wave overwhelming the NHS this winter after official data showed the outbreak is shrinking.

The Office for National Statistics claimed 722,300 people were infected on any given day in the seven-day spell ending July 31 β€” the equivalent of one in 75 people. This marked a 15 per cent drop on the week before, when the toll was upwards of 850,000.

And SAGE member Professor Neil Ferguson β€” who’s grim modelling led to the first lockdown β€” said he now believes the pandemic is something the UK will be able to manage with vaccines rather than ‘crisis measures’.

Covid cases increase for third day in row: Infections rise 12% to 27,429 as deaths drop 40% from 65 to 39

Coronavirus cases have increased for the third day in a row with Department of Health bosses today declaring a further 27,429 infections, a increase of 12 per cent on last Sunday’s figure of 27,429.

The number of people dying with the virus has decreased to 39 – a decrease of 40 per cent from 65 last Sunday.

Hospital admissions fell to 742 as of Tuesday, a 18.6 per cent decrease from the 912 people hospitalised in the previous week.

Britain’s total infections have now risen up to 6,069,362, while 130,320 people who have tested positive have lost their life to the virus since the start of the pandemic.

It comes after scientists claimed Britain will not need another lockdown to stop another Covid wave overwhelming the NHS this winter after official data showed the outbreak is shrinking.

The Office for National Statistics claimed 722,300 people were infected on any given day in the seven-day spell ending July 31 β€” the equivalent of one in 75 people. This marked a 15 per cent drop on the week before, when the toll was upwards of 850,000.

And SAGE member ‘Professor Lockdown’ Neil Ferguson β€” who’s grim modelling led to the first lockdown β€” said he now believes the pandemic is something the UK will be able to manage with vaccines rather than ‘crisis measures’.

He told The Times: ‘I think it’s unlikely we will need a new lockdown or even social distancing measures of the type we’ve had so far.’

Fellow Government scientific advisor Professor John Edmunds, an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, agreed, saying he believes the national health service will most likely be able to cope with the numbers of cases expected in the winter.

He said: ‘I suspect we won’t have to [impose any more]. The pinch point has always been pressure on the NHS and though it will be awkward for the NHS, so there will be pressure, I very much doubt they won’t be able to cope.’

But Boris Johnson has pressed ahead with plans to reintroduce restrictions by authorising contingency plans for ‘firebreak lockdowns’ should the NHS be overwhelmed cases by the end of the year.

Sources within Whitehall yesterday confirmed the government is prepared for ‘local, regional or national’ lockdowns in order to protect the health service from being swamped and reaching breaking point with cases.

The i reports the Prime Minister has given the green light to plans for ‘firebreak lockdowns’ should Covid cases cripple the NHS later this year.

Although scientists remain confident of the efficacy of Britain’s vaccines, Whitehall sources say fears persist over surging flu infections, a potential NHS staffing crisis and a rise in positive infections.

The senior Downing Street source said: ‘The Government believes it has got to grips with the pandemic following the vaccine rollout

‘Barring a new vaccine-beating strain, fears over a rise in infections similar to that seen last autumn are actually outweighed by other issues like an NHS staffing crisis and the likely resurgence in flu infections, and other respiratory diseases.

‘On top of Covid infections, these factors could tip the NHS back to the brink and force more lockdowns.’

It is understood that any subsequent lockdown would resemble the nation’s four-week ‘firebreak’ lockdown during November 2020.

The return of draconian restrictions would likely be short and during ‘school holidays and over Christmas’, the source adds.

Britain’s Covid outbreak is still flattening off, according to official statistics that dismissed hopes that the worst of the third wave was over.

Department of Health bosses posted another 31,808 cases on Friday, up seven per cent on the 29,622 recorded last week.

The number of victims dying with the virus – a measure which lags weeks behind infections – also increased by 35.3 per cent, jumping from 71 last week to 92.

But hospital admissions, which always turn before fatalities, continue to fall. There were 778 people hospitalised with Covid on Monday, down 16.2 per cent on the previous week.

The figures come as leading scientists warn achieving herd immunity against Covid is looking ever-increasingly impossible, with neither vaccines nor natural infections triggering ‘perfect’ protection.

Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious diseases expert at the University of East Anglia, said immunity against SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that causes Covid – is likely to be short-lived.

But separate official data offered a glimmer of hope, revealing England’s shrinking Covid outbreak towards the end of July was real and marked the first time cases had genuinely fallen since the third wave took off.

No10’s top scientists claimed the R rate β€” which shows how quickly the coronavirus is spreading β€” has dipped below one for the first time in 12 weeks. The UK Health Security Agency said the reproduction rate is between 0.8 and 1.1. For comparison, last week’s figure stood at between 1.1 and 1.4.

Vaccine sceptic, 46, dies of Covid after warning ‘anyone with similar thoughts’ to get jab

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